A better sandwich loaf

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Finished loaf on wire rack

This time, I did both the bulk rise and the second rise on the same day - from autolyse to bake in 11 hours.

I wanted to rely on visual clues and my instincts, rather than just leaving for the times the recipe told me. And I wanted to avoid another over-proofed loaf.


Getting proofing right

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Showing loaf ready to bake

I think one of the hardest things to learn with baking, and especially sourdough baking, is to know when fermentation is complete and the dough is ready for shaping.

When I started out last month, I was happy to rely only on timings and happily assumed that the bulk rise was complete as


A bit of a Squeeze

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Tall and tight

This loaf tasted delicious and had a great height, but it was just a little too big for the pot, so kind of caved in on itself whilst it baked. 

It's a shame, because I think this would have been a beautiful loaf but was just hindered by a lack of room to expand.


A total disaster

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Over-proofed, flat, dense boule on chopping board

I've had some good loaves, and some not so good loaves, but never a total disaster - until now.

Everything seemed to go wrong with this, and it's only right that I document this to learn from it.


"The best I've ever had"

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Baked sourdough loaf

Everything just seemed to go right with this loaf - the shape, the colour, the way I was able to handle it, the crumb structure, and the taste!

My sister-in-law said it was the "best sourdough she had ever had". Now I know she's biased, but a compliment none-the-less.